a glorious dawn

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Posts tagged science!

22,531 notes

nanodash:

nanodash:

Food colouring in corn syrup. Watch as they rotate it 5 times one way and then 5 times back.
Your mind is now blown.
This is an example of the strange things that happen in fluids with low Reynold’s number. Reynold’s number is a ratio of the inertial forces and the viscous forces in the fluid. When the viscosity is high and the inertial forces are low fluids behave very differently to the way we are used to. Remember that next time you are trying to swim in honey.

I giffed the original video for your viewing ease. Enjoy.

nanodash:

nanodash:

Food colouring in corn syrup. Watch as they rotate it 5 times one way and then 5 times back.

Your mind is now blown.

This is an example of the strange things that happen in fluids with low Reynold’s number. Reynold’s number is a ratio of the inertial forces and the viscous forces in the fluid. When the viscosity is high and the inertial forces are low fluids behave very differently to the way we are used to. Remember that next time you are trying to swim in honey.

I giffed the original video for your viewing ease. Enjoy.

(via dorkery)

Filed under cool beans the 'surface tension' between the drops of food colouring (I assume mostly water) and the corn syrup must be really high so the bubbles get stretched but don't break or mix science!

1,763 notes

The human talent for pattern-recognition is a two-edged sword: We’re especially good at finding patterns, even when they aren’t really there — something known as false pattern-recognition.

We hunger for significance — for signs that our personal existence is of special meaning to the universe. To that end, we’re all too eager to deceive ourselves and others.

In the third episode of his fantastic Cosmos series, Neil deGrasse Tyson reminds us of how pattern-recognition both fuels our creativity and makes our minds mislead us.
(via explore-blog)

(Source: explore-blog, via adirotynd)

Filed under neil degrasse awesome science!

332 notes

What do you think science is? There’s nothing magical about science. It is simply a systematic way for carefully and thoroughly observing nature and using consistent logic to evaluate results. Which part of that exactly do you disagree with? Do you disagree with being thorough? Using careful observation? Being systematic? Or using consistent logic?
Steven Novella (via thedragoninmygarage)

(via panickyintheuk)

Filed under SCIENCE! SCIENCE MOTHERFUCKERS ASKLJASFHAFSDA sorry I have emotions sometimes

159 notes

froggieslightroom:

I was reading some more about how Mars images are processed. Apparently due to the lighting conditions on Mars, when you white balance, it will cause the sky to become too blue. It should remain more butterscotch. So I isolated the sky and corrected it.
THIS is similar to how mars would look if you were there and had proper breathing equipment and comfy shoes because those rocks look sharp.
For real this time. 

froggieslightroom:

I was reading some more about how Mars images are processed. Apparently due to the lighting conditions on Mars, when you white balance, it will cause the sky to become too blue. It should remain more butterscotch. So I isolated the sky and corrected it.

THIS is similar to how mars would look if you were there and had proper breathing equipment and comfy shoes because those rocks look sharp.

For real this time. 

(Source: frogmanslightschool, via theteratophile)

Filed under science! space! mars

153,598 notes

mj-the-scientist:

invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.
Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

Why does this not have more notes?!?
YOU ARE LITERALLY LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF A ROBOT ON ANOTHER FUCKING PLANET
If you don’t think that’s the tightest shit, you can get out of my face.

mj-the-scientist:

invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.

Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

Why does this not have more notes?!?

YOU ARE LITERALLY LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF A ROBOT ON ANOTHER FUCKING PLANET

If you don’t think that’s the tightest shit, you can get out of my face.

Filed under mars space! science!

2,154 notes

paleoillustration:

(3D printing) Darwin’s Cladogram Tree with Finches, by Joaquin Baldwin:

"Charles Darwin’s first ever sketch of a tree of life, in the shape of an actual tree, with finches perched on the branches. Each branch and minute detail of Darwin’s original drawing is represented, and each finch represents the A, B, C and D marks on his sketch. The sketch appeared in his private notebook (“Notebook B on the transmutation of species,” 1837–1838).

If you look carefully, you’ll notice that each finch is slightly different, and the more apart they are from each other in the evolutionary tree, the more distinct the differences are.”

(via space-tart)

Filed under science!

18,607 notes

marginaliana:

myrrlyn:

mamavalkyrie:

miniprof:

molewoman:

miniprof:

OH before I  go to bed I should convey to you all the weirdest fact I learned today

I learned that when a caterpillar is metamorphosing into a butterfly within the cocoon, it is not, as I previously assumed, slowly growing wings and little antennae and whatever else. If we open a cocoon, apparently what we find is that the caterpillar has actually dissolved into a shapeless goo, from which the butterfly will be formed.

goo.

From which the butterfly is formed.

You can, of course, go the philosophical route with this: are they, then, the same creature, pre- and post- this complete reconstitution of the self? If the very brain, the nervous system, has been completely reassembled, how do we identify this as in any way the same?

So here’s the kicker.

Apparently one scientist figured he’d test this out by training a bunch of caterpillars to react negatively to a specific scent, which they would normally not react negatively to. This was all done prior to the cocoon stage.

And these butterflies. These post-goo, completely remade selves? They reacted negatively to the scent, too.

OKAY GOODNIGHT

here’s the source for that

EXCELLENT THANK YOU

WHAT?! That is metal as fuck

hot damn

(Source: essaymarking)

Filed under science! insects

11 notes

It’s all trivial – your grouse, my hermit, Bernard’s Byron. Comparing what we’re looking for misses the point. It’s wanting to know that makes us matter. Otherwise we’re going out the way we came in. That’s why you can’t believe in the afterlife, Valentine. Believe in the after, by all means, but not the life. Believe in God, the soul, the spirit, the infinite, believe in angels if you like, but not in the great celestial get-together for an exchange of views. If the answers are in the back of the book I can wait, but what a drag. Better to struggle on knowing that failure is final.
Hannah Jarvis in Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, act 2 scene 7 (via flameintobeing)

Filed under tom stoppard science!

13,549 notes

China's First Lunar Rover Live-Blogged Its Own Death

futurist-foresight:

The Yutu rovers sad demise.

Yutu Rover

sweetmadameblue:

kittencuffs:

sirseahorse:

persephon-y:

The Yutu rover suffered a mysterious “abnormality” over the weekend. And the robot’s microblogged death note may make you cry.

“The sun has fallen, and the temperature is dropping so quickly…to tell you all a secret, I don’t feel that sad. I was just in my own adventure story - and like every hero, I encountered a small problem.” “Goodnight, Earth,” concluded the rover. “Goodnight, humanity.”

This mysterious abnormality resulted in the rover being unable to enter sleep mode, which would turn on its internal heaters and protect it from the -170 C temperatures of the lunar night. You just read the parting words of a robot freezing to death.


image

(via mj-the-scientist)

Filed under oh noooo weeping space! science!